Gaining Perspective: The UN Programme of Action’s Sixth Biennial Meeting

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

The Sixth Biennial Meeting of States (BMS6) was the final meeting before the Third Review Conference of the UN Small Arms Programme of Action (PoA), scheduled for June 2018, and the first since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Taking account of the SDGs and other new developments, the main task for BMS6 was to prepare the ground for the Review Conference.

What the National Reports Reveal: Trends in UN PoA and ITI Reporting (Issue Brief 13)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

The Programme of Action on Small Arms (PoA) and the International Tracing Instrument (ITI) are politically binding instruments through which UN member states undertake to implement a range of small arms control measures to address the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons, now supplemented by the Arms Trade Treaty.  

One Meeting after Another: UN Process Update (Issue Brief 12)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

A new Small Arms Survey Issue Brief, One Meeting After Another: UN Process Updatedraws on official documents and the author’s own observations of the Fifth Biennial Meeting of States (BMS5) to assess the meeting. BMS5 was the latest in a series of meetings on the UN Small Arms Programme of Action (PoA).

Behind the Curve: New Technologies, New Control Challenges (Occasional Paper 32)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

Behind the Curve: New Technologies, New Control Challenges, this Occasional Paper from the Small Arms Survey, looks at three recent developments in small arms manufacturing, technology, and design—polymer frames, modular weapons, and 3D printing—as well as the use of new technologies for improved small arms control.

Implementation in Practice: National Points of Contact in the RECSA Region (Issue Brief 7)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

International and regional instruments to control the illicit trade of small arms specifically call for states to designate individuals and administrative processes to help them attain established objectives. For example, both the 2001 Programme of Action on Small Arms (PoA) and the 2005 International Tracing Instrument (ITI) include provisions for each UN member state to establish or designate a national point of contact (NPC) to act as a liaison with other states concerning their implementation (UNGA, 2001, art. II.5; 2005, art. VI.25).

Regional Organizations and the PoA (Research Note 21)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

Countering the illicit trade in small arms lends itself to regional action. In many countries, small arms circulate widely beyond state control. National governments are challenged by cross-border demand for weapons, lucrative markets for traffickers, and ineffective national laws to regulate brokering and trafficking of small arms across state lines. These problems all call for regional approaches.

The Programme of Action Implementation Monitor (Phase 1): Assessing Reported Progress (Occasional Paper 30)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

The UN Programme of Action on small arms and light weapons (PoA) was adopted in 2001 to provide a framework for activities to counter the illicit trade in such arms. At its Second Review Conference in New York—from 27 August – 7 September 2012— the PoA has brought together member states, expert advisors, and NGOs to review the progress made in its implementation.

2012 and Beyond: Advocacy and Action in the UN Small Arms Process

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on 24 November, 2020

This Briefing Paper examines future policy directions for the 2001 UN Programme of Action on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. It assesses the achievements and short-comings of the Programme of Action in its first ten years, noting the difficulties encountered in effectively supporting, monitoring, and assessing implementation, and the changing context in which it now exists.